A.G.M 2021

A.G.M 2021

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Its 2021 and here at Epilepsy Berkshire we are looking forward to Purple day on the 26th March followed by, our AGM on the 29th.

Because of covid and lockdown, meeting in public areas may not be allowed and as the current recomendations that people should shield until the backend of march.

This may be a virtual meeting (on Zoom)

More details available nearer the time

Epilepsy Vaccination

People with epilepsy included in priority group 6 for Covid vaccine

Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) who have assured us that epilepsy is included in priority group 6 as defined by the Joint Committee on Vaccinations and Immunisations.

The main risk groups identified by the Committee are as follows:

How will I know it’s my turn to get a vaccine? 

  • Chronic respiratory disease, including chronic obstructive
  • pulmonary disease (COPD), cystic fibrosis and severe asthma
  • Chronic heart disease (and vascular disease)
  • Chronic kidney disease 
  • Chronic liver disease
  • Chronic neurological disease including epilepsy
  • Down’s syndrome
  • Severe and profound learning disability
  • Diabetes
  • Solid organ, bone marrow and stem cell transplant recipients
  • People with specific cancers
  • Immunosuppression due to disease or treatment
  • Asplenia and splenic dysfunction
  • Morbid obesity
  • Severe mental illness.

•    The NHS will let you know when it’s your turn to have the vaccine. Do not contact the NHS for a vaccination before then. Once you have received your letter you can book your vaccination appointment online, or for those who cannot access the online booking service, they can book by calling 119. 


•    You will need your ten-digit NHS number, it will be on the letter sent to you. You can also find it on your prescriptions or through your GP online service. 
•    If a patient cannot go to one of the large vaccination centres, they can choose to have their vaccination at their GP surgery when it’s available there or a pharmacy. 

About us

About US

We are a small charity set up to bring together people in the Berkshire area (we also help people living close to Berkshire too) who live with Epilepsy and enable a sense of community spirit, where we can meet up for to chat and give mutual support and where possible help resolve many of the issues relating to living with Epilepsy. Offering socials events which can be enjoyed in a safe environment knowing there is support available wherever necessary

We want to educate people and organisations and help them to be more aware of epilepsy, its effects on lives and how they can help both in general and how to deal with someone who may be having a seizure.

Linking people to allow regular contact over the phone or social media, to foster a growing community that cares for each other listening to the positives and negatives and supporting each other in the everyday issues of living with epilepsy.

We hope to update our website regularly with relevant information, however if there is something you would like to know about please contact us and we will do everything we can to try and help.

Please also click into our Events to see what is happening monthly. Before Covid 19 We used to meet regularly every 2nd Tuesday at St Nicolas Church Sutcliffe Avenue Earley Reading Berkshire RG6 7JN. From 2.30 until 4.30. Now we meet online through zoom meetings, Mondays at 7:30If you have ideas for the charity or social events again please let us know and we will be in touch to find out more.

What we do

What we do

We are a small charity that has been set up to help people in the Berkshire area and close to the boarders of the county living with Epilepsy. It is run by people living with Epilepsy, carers and people who have volunteered to support us in our aims.

Walk Along the Thames

We realise that Epilepsy affects people in very different ways. Each Person, the newly diagnosed and the person who has lived with Epilepsy for a long time, often need different types of support and advice.

We Aim to :-

To help those with epilepsy by giving support to their needs and requirements.

To help educate the community and organisations, eg schools, colleges, scouts and guides, about epilepsy and the effects it has on people who have it and their families.  All members to have a say and be involved in coming up with ideas for the talks where possible.

To facilitate social activities to promote a sense of wellbeing for people with epilepsy and their carers.  To develop friendships and a sense of belonging.

To bring more people with epilepsy together to discuss their particular issues and offer help and support.

To supply equipment where necessary to ensure the safety of people with epilepsy.  This would depend on individual needs.

To help, where possible, those with epilepsy in the work place or to facilitate their needs for self-employment.

To fund raise to support the above purposes, all members to be involved and raise ideas on specific things we could do.

Purple Day

What is purple day

Purple Day is an international grassroots effort dedicated to increasing awareness about epilepsy worldwide. On March 26th annually, people in countries around the world are invited to wear purple and host events in support of epilepsy awareness. Last year, people in more than 85 countries on all continents participated in Purple Day! Canada is the only country in the world who officially recognizes March 26th as Purple Day through the Purple Day Act implemented on June 28, 2012.

Cassidy Megan’s Story

Cassidy Megan created the idea of Purple Day in 2008, motivated by her own struggles with epilepsy. Cassidy’s goal is to get people talking about epilepsy in an effort to dispel myths and inform those with seizures that they are not alone. The Epilepsy Association of The Maritimes came on board in 2008 to help develop Cassidy’s idea which is now known as Purple Day.

Epilepsy and Covid 19

Does having epilepsy put me at increased risk from coronavirus?

A recent study published in the British Medical Journal suggests that people with epilepsy could have a slightly increased risk of being admitted to hospital or dying from coronavirus.

The study does not show whether epilepsy itself causes this increased risk, or whether the risk is linked to other factors that could affect people with epilepsy. For example, people with epilepsy may be more likely to be in residential care, have visits from carers or have other conditions alongside their epilepsy. These things could increase their risk of catching or being more severely affected by coronavirus. 

This small increased risk does not mean you need to shield, unless your doctor has advised you to. But it is important to keep yourself safe by following guidance on social distancing, washing your hands and wearing a face covering if you are able to.